Is it bad luck to take sand from a beach

Hawaii: Is Peleís Curse real?

is it bad luck to take sand from a beach

Answer 1 of What about shells found on the beach? I have no interest in bringing home same, or even shells for that matter. However, several people have.

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Aloha Everyone! We call it a modern legend because some people believe that a ranger in the national park system made it up in the s, to stop people from taking the lava rocks. This may be true but there may be some deep roots attached to it. The Hawaiian islands are said to be discovered between and when the Polynesians were looking for a safe place to be as there was war in many of the Polynesian islands. Along with these first settlers came a rigid set of rules called the Kapu System.

Snopes needs your help! Learn more. Though the more skeptical will scoffingly dismiss the notion as pure hooey,. And the only way to undo the jinx is to return the purloined items whence they came. Legend has it that Pele, goddess of fire and volcanoes, is so angered when the rocks which she sees as her children are taken from her that she exacts a terrible revenge on the thief.

What about shells found on the beach? I have no interest in bringing home same, or even shells for that matter. However, several people have requested shells as souvenirs. I'm not a very superstitious person, but I'd hate to offend anyone by a few shells. So true!!!

What about shells found on the beach? I have no interest in bringing home same, or even shells for that matter. However, several people have requested shells as souvenirs. I'm not a very superstitious person, but I'd hate to offend anyone by a few shells. Ohhh, good question. My Mom asked for a shell too and I didn't even think twice about it. Is it bad luck?



Pele and Lava Rocks

This was my first time re-visiting a black sand beach in Hawaii after a really strange incident occurred a couple years back when I visited the Big Island. Back when I first started traveling, my mother would ask me to bring her back souvenirs ó but not the traditional type. The types of souvenirs she enjoyed were actual bits and pieces of the places I visited, so while most people turned to gift shops to bring back things for their family, I turned to the ground.

Donít Take Peleís Sand!

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Pele's Curse is the belief that anything natively Hawaiian, such as sand , rock , or pumice , will effect bad luck on whoever takes it away from Hawaii. One version about the legend's genesis is this: a disgruntled park ranger, angry at the number of rocks that were being taken from the islands by visitors, said that Pele would curse them with bad luck should they take anything. - It was sent from Cleveland, Ohio but had no return address or name.

I know that taking sand is supposedly bad luck, but... - Maui Forum

Please forgive me and I pray that once I send it back to where it came from my bad luck will go away. This letter by Timothy Murray is among thousands of apologetic correspondence received by Hawaii Volcano National Park and local post offices annually. Packages returning rocks and sand, accompanied by letters telling of the misfortune and calamity they caused, flood Hawaiian mailboxes at a rate that would give pause to even the most skeptical among us. Can a rock or sand souvenir really bring misfortune to the unsuspecting tourist who casually pockets it from a Hawaiian beach or park? While some scoff at the notion that bad luck can be blamed on a rock, others have come to believe that rocks and sand taken from Hawaii do, in fact, fetch with them a curse of epic proportion. Whether or not you believe in bad luck, below are a few reasons why you may want to think twice before taking some sand or rocks home with you as a souvenir. Pele is the goddess of fire and volcanos who, according to legend, resides in the crater of Kilauea on Hawaii Island which, today, is Hawaii Volcano National Park.

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