At the junction of a rib and the sternum

Sternum Bone Anatomy

at the junction of a rib and the sternum

At the junction of a rib and the sternum is this type of cartilage. Hyaline. The skeleton of the external ear is this type of cartilage. Elastic. Supporting the trachea.

and    ok google lets play trivia   how to find out how many points on license pa

The thoracic cage rib cage forms the thorax chest portion of the body. It consists of the 12 pairs of ribs with their costal cartilages and the sternum Figure 6. The ribs are anchored posteriorly to the 12 thoracic vertebrae T1—T The thoracic cage protects the heart and lungs. The sternum is the elongated bony structure that anchors the anterior thoracic cage.

The sternum or breastbone is a long flat bone located in the central part of the chest. It connects to the ribs via cartilage and forms the front of the rib cage , thus helping to protect the heart , lungs , and major blood vessels from injury. Shaped roughly like a necktie , it is one of the largest and longest flat bones of the body. Its three regions are the manubrium, the body, and the xiphoid process. The sternum is a long, flat bone , forming the middle portion of the front of the chest. The top of the sternum supports the clavicles collarbones and its edges join with the costal cartilages of the first two pairs of ribs.

When refering to evidence in academic writing, you should always try to reference the primary original source. That is usually the journal article where the information was first stated. In most cases Physiopedia articles are a secondary source and so should not be used as references. Physiopedia articles are best used to find the original sources of information see the references list at the bottom of the article. If you believe that this Physiopedia article is the primary source for the information you are refering to, you can use the button below to access a related citation statement. Cite article. Original Editor - User:Jeroen Verwichte.

The thoracic cage rib cage forms the thorax chest portion of the body. It consists of the 12 pairs of ribs with their costal cartilages and the sternum Figure 1. The ribs are anchored posteriorly to the 12 thoracic vertebrae T1—T The thoracic cage protects the heart and lungs. The sternum is the elongated bony structure that anchors the anterior thoracic cage. It consists of three parts: the manubrium, body, and xiphoid process.

The costal cartilages are bars of hyaline cartilage that serve to prolong the ribs forward and contribute to the elasticity of the walls of the thorax. Costal cartilage is only found at the anterior ends of the ribs, providing medial extension. The first seven pairs are connected with the sternum ; the next three are each articulated with the lower border of the cartilage of the preceding rib; the last two have pointed extremities, which end in the wall of the abdomen. Their breadth, as well as that of the intervals between them, diminishes from the first to the last. They are broad at their attachments to the ribs, and taper toward their sternal extremities, excepting the first two, which are of the same breadth throughout, and the sixth, seventh, and eighth, which are enlarged where their margins are in contact. They also vary in direction: the first descends a little to the sternum, the second is horizontal, the third ascends slightly, while the others are angular, following the course of the ribs for a short distance, and then ascending to the sternum or preceding cartilage. The anterior surface is convex, and looks forward and upward: that of the first gives attachment to the costoclavicular ligament and the subclavius muscle ; those of the first six or seven at their sternal ends, to the pectoralis major.



Slipping rib syndrome

Costal cartilage

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

2 COMMENTS

  1. Henriette L. says:

    How to rebuild a floor jack does meghan markle have any children

  2. Océane L. says:







Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *